no deposit online casino

Smiley Knutsch

Review of: Smiley Knutsch

Reviewed by:
Rating:
5
On 21.07.2020
Last modified:21.07.2020

Summary:

Smiley Knutsch

llll➤ Hunderte wunderschöne animierte Kuss Smileys & Smilies Gifs, Bilder und Animationen. Alle animierten Kuss Smileys & Smilies Grafiken und Cliparts sind. Das Emoji „Kussmund“ ist ein Symbol eines Kusses. Es sieht aus wie ein Lippenabdruck (mit 💄 Lippenstift), der auf einer Oberfläche wie eine Wange oder ein. Knutsch Emoji: 😗 Bedeutung. Der Emoji hat seine Lippen zur einem Kuss gespitzt 😗. Unter Android und iOS sieht man runde Augen und gespitzte Lippen,​.

Smiley Knutsch Bedeutung von 💋 Kussmund Emoji

Emoji: 😘 Kuss zuwerfendes Gesicht (Gesicht | Kuss | Kuss Zuwerfendes Gesicht) | Kategorien: 🔝 TOP , 😍 Liebe & Valentinstag, 🥰 Gesichter. - Erkunde Gabriele Schremmers Pinnwand „Kuss smiley“ auf Pinterest. Weitere Ideen zu smiley, smiley liebe, smiley bilder. Das Emoji "Kuss zuwerfendes Gesicht" ist ein 😗 Küssendes Gesicht mit zusammen gekniffenen Augen mit einem ausgepusteten Herz. Im Gegensatz Combo. Das Emoji „Kussmund“ ist ein Symbol eines Kusses. Es sieht aus wie ein Lippenabdruck (mit 💄 Lippenstift), der auf einer Oberfläche wie eine Wange oder ein. Emojis können manchmal echt verwirrend sein. WhatsApp-Smileys: Bedeutung vom Kuss-Emoji. #1 Kuss-Smiley unter Freunden. Deine Freunde sind die. Knutsch Emoji: 😗 Bedeutung. Der Emoji hat seine Lippen zur einem Kuss gespitzt 😗. Unter Android und iOS sieht man runde Augen und gespitzte Lippen,​. llll➤ Hunderte wunderschöne animierte Kuss Smileys & Smilies Gifs, Bilder und Animationen. Alle animierten Kuss Smileys & Smilies Grafiken und Cliparts sind.

Smiley Knutsch

llll➤ Hunderte wunderschöne animierte Kuss Smileys & Smilies Gifs, Bilder und Animationen. Alle animierten Kuss Smileys & Smilies Grafiken und Cliparts sind. Emoji: 😘 Kuss zuwerfendes Gesicht (Gesicht | Kuss | Kuss Zuwerfendes Gesicht) | Kategorien: 🔝 TOP , 😍 Liebe & Valentinstag, 🥰 Gesichter. Kuss Smilies, Smileys, Emoticons, Smiles, Smeilis, Küssen, Kuß, Schmatzer, Kiss, kostenlos herunterladen, direkt kopieren oder verlinken in der.

Smiley Knutsch - Beispiele für die Verwendung von 😘 Kuss zuwerfendes Gesicht

Für Links auf dieser Seite erhält desired ggf. Screenshot via WhatsApp Smiley Knutsch Jetzt anmelden. Wie genau der Kuss-Smiley gewertet werden kann, ist natürlich abhängig von Deinem Verhältnis zu der Person, von welcher Du ihn bekommst. Hier gibt es aber auch die Alternative des knutschenden Smileys ohne Herzchen. Du schreibst mit jemandem, der ziemlich oft sarkastische oder ironische Kommentare vom Sunmaker Echtgeld lässt? Lifestyle-Tests Wärst du ein guter Royal? Dabei gibt es verschiedene Bedeutungen, die hinter dem Emoji stecken können. The bikini is a symbol of summer, sun and fun. Can also be interpreted as a threatening punch. Leggings By katepalmerr. Tags: uh oh stinky, uh oh, stinky, le monke, monkey, poopy, poop, memes, meme, dank, gamer, funny, anime, tiktok, poo, tiktok. Symbol of Jesus Del Pozo Quasar, smiley knutsch Paypal Daten ändern known in the 60s by the hippies.

Tags: spider, uh, icon. Tags: thewalkingdead, the walking dead, twd, zombie, zombies, zombieland, zombie field, uh oh, fence, faded, old, withered, weathered, vintage, classic, vintage, grunge, punk, dead, death, halloween, spooky.

Tags: stinky, le monke, monkey, meme, funny, poop, poopy, uh oh, uh oh stinky, tiktok. Tags: yeah, uh huh, whatever.

Yeah, Yeah. Leggings By BtheLight. Tags: uh, huh, funny, humor. Tags: huey, huey helicopter, vietnam helicopter, bell uh 1, bell hu 1, bell helicopter, chopper, vietnam chopper, mash helicopter, mash, medivac, united states army helicopter, vietnam war, steve h clark.

Tags: murder, kill, dead, death, musical, chicago, pop, six, squish, uh uh, cicero, lipshitz, broadway, show, play. He had it coming Leggings By ArtistAriana.

Tags: uh, kiss, uh kiss, kiss mouth, peck, knutsch, smooch, knutschmund, knut shear, smooch stain, love, good kisser. Tags: meme, stinky, uh oh, monkey, stinky monkey, oh, uh, uh oh stinky, baboon, gorilla, fart, noise, loud, smelly, poop, diaper, funny, hillarious, joke, memee, ape, birthday, christmas, wrapping, original.

Uh Oh Stinky Leggings By luminak. Tags: uh huh, acceptable, agreed, clunse. Acceptable Leggings By Clunse. Tags: sikorsky, uh 34d, helicopter cartoon.

Tags: houston, cougars, uh, cougars. Cougars Merch Leggings By pandujancuk. Tags: helicopter, uh 60, cartoon helicopter.

Tags: cloud, vapor, vaporwave, vapourwave, lemon, graphic, sargemac, street, streetwear, fashion, vector. Leggings By SargeMac. Tags: uh oh, stinky, poop, funny, poopy, monkey, le monke, animal, meme, internet, uh oh stinky, fat, primate, nature.

Tags: uh, eyes, ten eye cartoon, line art, doodle, conceptual art, experimental art, cartoon art, graphic art, simple, minimalist, dark art, black, titus toledo.

Leggings By titus toledo. Tags: university of miami. Leggings By SpencerFlinson. Tags: cartoon, comic, confused. Uh Leggings By Alwaysxray.

UH Leggings By barbaradouglas. Tags: b2k, tour , hip hop, albums, song, uh uh, gots ta be, omarion, fizz b2k, lil fizz, j boog.

Tags: chicago, pop, six, squish, uh uh, uh, cicero, lipschitz, musical, musicals, play, drama, theatre, theater, broadway, rehearsal, the musical, cell, cellblock, cell block tango, tango, dance, jail, geekably, funny, cute.

Chicago Leggings By geekably. Tags: le monke, uh oh stinky, meme. Tags: monke, uh oh stinky, stinky poo, stinky monkey, fat monkey, funny monkey, monkey meme, meme, dank meme, uh oh, poopies.

Uh Oh Stinky! Tags: jeffy, sml, why, uh, dipper, funny. Tags: uh, invader zim, gir, fan art. Tags: le monke, monkey, uh oh stinky.

Tags: uh, children, emotion, anger, stupid, happy, frightened, laugh, being, fantastic, flat, abstract, monster, cute, cartoon, alien, creature, funny, face, halloween, animal, little, colorful, mascot, comic, cheerful, kids, mutant, toy, bizarre, spooky, smile, bubble.

Cartoon monsters. Leggings By alijun. Tags: b2k, millennium, tour, , hiphop, boy band, albums, songs, uh uh, gots ta be, omarion, fizz b2k, lil fizz, j boog.

B2K Tour Leggings By iieurpaiuhd. Tags: uh oh stinky, uh oh, stinky, le monke, monkey, poopy, poop, memes, meme, dank, gamer, funny, anime, tiktok, poo, tiktok.

Tags: vnaf, uh 1, gunship, cartoon, aviation art. Tags: cat, kitty, what, help, uh, uwu, owo. UwU Leggings By emoryherbert.

Tags: uh, oh, style, cool, music, handsome, album. Golden Stars Leggings By colemangonz. Tags: sml, jeffy, funny, uh, youtube, sll, sbl. Tags: wilson, cast away, tom hanks, wilson volleyball, stranded island, robert zemekis, best friend for life, bff, bff forever, indian, skull bites knife, native american, silence of the lambs, skull, bones, skeleton, tattoo, moth, i will tear your saw apart, hellraiser, pinhead, cenobites, hellbound heart, clive barker, horror, cult classic, nightbreed, doug bradley, mattismatt83, smoke, match, light, flame.

Leggings By MattisMatt Tags: redbubble man, funny, stinky, uh, oh, poopy. Tags: cube, life, house, uh, box, mountain, cliff.

Tags: sml, jeffy, bowerjr, cheafpeepee, uh, youtube, supermariologan. Is uncertain or disappointed, had imagined this in a different way.

Emoji smiley knutsch unhappy and disgruntled. Dissatisfied with the weather, small mistakes or the behavior of a person.

After a hard day, ready to throw in the towel. However, has to endure the situation and will have worked it through some day. Smiley is extremely dismayed and bewildered.

Or damn angry: That's almost the final straw. Because of smiley knutsch little sleep, because of what is going on around you, from a person or situation.

Is very exhausted and broken. Reluctant smiley with raised eyebrows and mouth downturned, moaning about grueling, unpleasant but inevitable things.

Is weepy, upset and completely exhausted, mentally or physically. The emoji is entreatingly begging for something: wants to borrow some money or the car.

If you cannot get ahead by asking for something, puppy dog eyes are the last resort to get what you want. A tear drop smiley knutsch running down the cheek.

Not so much general sadness, but rather pain over one thing. It still hurts to remember a certain event. Tears are pouring out of the eyes like a waterfall.

Represents injury, pain or defeat. Is also used ironically or something is so funny that you die of laughter. Is snorting contemptuously as a sign of superiority.

Is proud and triumphing over someone else. Reaction to something unfavorable or a sign of rejection. You had better keep out of the person's way.

Is annoyed and already sulking with a deep-red face. The serious-looking smiley is really upset and keeps using four-letter smiley knutsch. Represents a sudden outburst of fury or frustration.

The exploding head can also be used to express shock or awe. Expresses shame; something is very embarrassing. Reacts to a compliment or a flattering message that the person did not want to receive.

Bright red head, the tongue is hanging from the mouth and drops of sweat are on the forehead. The hottest place in the world lies in Iran: In , the highest temperature of The smile is almost frozen.

Already totally blue in the face from the cold temperature, tortured facial expression. Only a cup of tea, coffee, or the hot tub can help now.

Is scared stiff, feeling nothing but fear smiley knutsch panic. The creepy emoji can also be used ironically or as a symbol for Halloween.

Seems to be deeply shocked and surprised by an ominous event or intense experience. Cold sweat is dripping from the forehead and the mouth is open, dumbfounded.

Sweating due to physical or mental stress. Has experienced a stressful situation with an unpleasant outcome, for example, a test. Has gotten out of a difficult or delicate situation, but not without bumps and bruises.

Things went different than they should have. The school is stressing or there is still so much to do in the office. You are tired, but still have so much work to do.

It's an open and cordial gesture and an expression of warmth and friendliness. Smiley knutsch a statement, a person's intelligence, or an idea into question.

Is mulling over something or thinking about a brilliant idea. Typical gesture, which shows that the other person is not telling the truth.

Thinks he's being lied to. Or someone is confiding a secret that should not be retold. Nicely telling your counterpart to shut up. Symbol of a falsehood, boast, or an unlikely story.

Is speechless, has no words. Someone does not want to or cannot say anything about a specific topic.

Used in difficult, embarrassing or bad conversations. Imagine what it would say if it had a mouth. Tired, annoyed, emotionless, no patience, the end of the flagpole is reached.

The right words are missing to continue a conversation. Expression of nervousness, awkwardness or embarrassment. Scared and guilty smile: Someone has done something stupid and tries to resolve the tense situation by grimacing.

Finds the current situation or a person boring or annoying. The unpleasantly surprised face is lost for words due to a shocking affair.

In response to bad behavior or a rude message. Smiley knutsch can be added to what has just been said. Expresses horror as well as fear, worry and mistrust.

In response to a negative surprise. Got caught red-handed and just feels totally taken by surprise. Face with raised eyebrows, open eyes and open mouth.

A mixture of shock and disappointment. Represents fear, frustration, horror and unexpected, negative surprises.

Perplexed smiley is looking completely puzzled. Is positively or negatively surprised: from mildly astonished to completely steamrolled.

Astonished face with wide open mouth and eyes: overwhelmed with surprise, completely shocked or sheer incredulity.

Can hardly believe what just happened. In comics or cartoons, zZz above the head stands for sleeping characters.

The emoji is tired, wants to go to bed or is just about to fall asleep from boredom. Represents desire for a person, delicious food, the new car, or the anticipation of an event.

Expression of extreme interest and desire. The bubble emerging from the nose is a typical manga symbol for a sleeping character.

Or as an expression that a conversation or excursion is extremely boring and drowsy. Smiley with crossed eyes and open mouth is totally dazed.

Is confused and so dizzy it doesn't know which side is up. Also symbolizes strong emotions or drunkenness. Lips are closed or chat partner's lips should remain closed.

Can also mean silence because you cannot find the right words. The emoji has a confused facial expression: due to tiredness or the currently confused emotional world.

Also known as drunken face. Might mean disgust, reluctance, or aversion, or stand for sickness. Might show how drunk the person was last night.

The puking smiley can also state what you think of something. Shows that someone is ill or feels uncomfortable. Either to protect yourself or others from infection.

Someone is in the hospital, has to go to the doctor or has caught a disease. Wearing the masks is widely spread in Asia. Caught a flu or other illness that is associated with fever.

Or is worried about getting sick. The bandage symbolizes health problems. Could have won something or is sensing a financial chance.

Implicates a sense of wealth. Typical American smiley with cowboy hat from the Wild West. Stands for freedom, nature, and hard work.

Wants to cause trouble, is a real teaser or planning something ugly just now. You should be particularly careful.

Represents mischievous acts or remarks as well as treachery. An ugly figure with horns, chasing evil souls.

Traditional disguise on New Year's Eve to ward off evil spirits. Has supernatural powers and brings forth disaster.

The red mask has eyebrows and a beard and a noticeably long nose. Made-up clown face from the circus world. The comic version of a pile of feces.

Can describe a situation, replace the swear word, or criticize a statement of the chat partner. Symbol for Halloween or jokingly for creepy things, e.

The skull emoji is used in unpleasant situations or to symbolize terrible things. The death's head with crossed bones is a symbol of death.

A warning sign for toxic substances and hazards. Symbol for an extraterrestrial being. However, smiles friendly and comes in peace.

It's like being remotely controlled and working like a robot. Can also be used for deadhearted people or refer to artificial intelligence and sci-fi movies.

Means fun and smirking, mostly used by cat lovers. The cattiness might stand for femininity. The eyes are smiling, it's grinning smiley knutsch and very satisfied.

The chat partner can have fun with this cat. Is smiley knutsch and helpless with laughter. Something is extremely funny or silly. You are relieved and have tears of joy in your eyes.

Is very much in love or very smiley knutsch for a friendly service. Likes something very much and expresses admiration that way.

It mocks you, is sarcastic or having fun at your expense. However, you had better be cautious. Its lips are pointed and it wants to kiss you. Cats have a reputation for being very choosy and tend to show affection rather reluctantly.

It has got hollow, white eyes and is holding its paws next to the mouth. Needs a break right now. Reaction to something scandalous or shocking.

A tear is running down the cheek. The corners of the mouth and smiley knutsch whiskers are pointing downwards. Is in a bad mood, frustrated, and has turned away angrily.

Known as the Grumpy Cat, a grumpy-looking cat that became an Internet phenomenon. Two people gave 'Nützlichkeit' self-interest as a main answer, but all others were more positive.

One category of response that I had most expected to hear, 'man hat das gelernt als Kind' [we learnt it as children] or 'aus Gewohnheit' [out of habit], was only popular with informants over the age of The two most frequent answers, given by over one third of my informants, were: 'Kontakt herzustellen' [to make contact] and 'Aufrechterhaltung des Kontakts' [to maintain contact].

The second most frequent answer was: 'Aus Höflichkeit' [to be polite], and the third 'um ein Gespräch anzufangen' [to start a conversation].

Other answers demonstrated that many informants have a clear idea of the importance of respect for the "face", both "negative' and "positive", of their interactants: they want to show that they like and respect the other person and that they aim to do so as unintrusively as possible, e.

Many informants explicitly mentioned respect Respekt or Würdigung as a reason to greet. Perhaps surprisingly, only one person gave the response: 'Gäste willkommen zu heissen' [to welcome guests], and only one: 'Wenn man eine Person das erste Mal an einem Tag sieht' [When one sees someone for the first time that day], perhaps because it seemed too obvious an answer for most people to give.

One informant might have been speaking for all the others when she said: 'Es ist so normal wie Sand am Meer' [It is as normal as sand at the seaside].

First I must explain why I asked this rather provocative question. Over the years I have noticed that a variety of outsiders in Switzerland, from punks to drunks and from foreigners to beggars, are criticized either for not knowing how to greet properly or for not greeting at all.

As an outsider myself, I know how long it can take to learn the wide variety of conventions of politeness in GSS. Indeed, I spoke with a beggar, representing a social group which is much maligned in many societies, and he wished me 'schönen Aabe' [a nice evening] when I went on my way.

Male and female informants of both age-groups had similar opinions. One woman mentioned foreign men as impolite; another woman felt that Moslem women are unable to make eye-contact, if they greet at all, because their head-scarves act as a barrier to communication.

The second largest group to be criticized by 5 young people, i. Other social groups to be mentioned by 1 or 2 informants were punks, drunks, sports fans, people from a low social class, psychologically disturbed people, people under stress, uneducated people, old people, young people up to 17 years old by a twenty-year-old and small children under 10 years old by a year-old.

It was generally recognized that many groups who do not fit into conventional society "Randgruppen" have their own greeting conventions among themselves: they may not greet according to traditionally accepted convention, but they have special ways of communicating with other social "misfits".

There was also some understanding that people from other cultures do not necessarily mean to be rude by Swiss standards when they fail to greet.

All of my informants were able to answer this question, and many gave additional comments including opinions about the comparative politeness of older people which I will document here.

Some informants who asked: 'Was heisst jung? To me, the informants under 26 were young and those over 26 old er , but my young informants considered themselves older than children and my informants over the age of 60 considered anyone under 60 to be young.

Bearing such subjective judgments in mind it is still possible to draw some general conclusions from the answers to this question.

Traditionally, younger people have been expected to greet older people first and many older people expect this custom to be adhered to often in vain.

Other older people recognize that if young people are to be expected to be polite to them, they must be polite in return, and this might mean greeting first.

My 4 female informants over the age of 90 agreed that they had more time than younger people to pay attention to the conventions of politeness.

They also agreed that most young people are very polite, even saying 'danke' when old people stand aside to allow them to pass on their skateboards.

Both negative and positive judgements were expressed by both old and young informants about the old and the young generally. Young people claimed that older people were 'freundlicher' [more friendly] and 'geduldiger' [more patient]; on the other hand they can be 'mürrisch' [surly] and 'stur' [stubborn].

Young people were often seen as 'höflicher' [more polite], 'offener' [more open], 'lebenslustiger' [fuller of the joy of living], 'kontaktfreudiger' [more sociable], and more likely to smile when greeting one another.

My older informants may see themselves as 'anständiger' [better behaved] and more genuinely interested in their speech partner, but also as likely to be 'gehemmter' [more inhibited] and 'stur' [stubborn].

Informants of all ages agreed that old people are 'grussfreudiger' 'sie grüssen eher' [they greet more readily].

No older people claimed that young people are impolite, but one woman claimed that older people speak more precisely than young people - a perception which is common to many cultures.

Finally, one of the nuns that I questioned commented that young people have been calling her 'Pinguin' [penguin] and 'ferngesteuerter Kohlensack' [remote-controlled sack of coal] for decades.

According to Janet Holmes, women are more positively polite than men. They take responsibility for social cohesion, are more cooperative than men in many communicative situations, and avoid FTAs more resolutely than men.

Their politeness may be seen as resulting from their powerlessness in society Holmes 19 , or it may be a consequence of their being more sympathetic and attentive to others "other-oriented" than men Holmes 7.

Holmes drew her conclusions from a large number of studies on gender and politeness. My aim with Question iv was to see if they could be confirmed with respect to politeness in GSS.

One older male informant said that I was asking about an "antiquated" stereotype, but he was still able to give me examples of women being ruder than men.

Most of the additional comments originated with female informants and supported Holmes's finding that women are more other-oriented than men.

Girls found that women are 'herzlicher' [warmer], 'verständnisvoller' [more understanding] and 'weniger primitiv' [less crude]. One girl wrote: 'Sie haben von Natur aus eine freundliche Ausstrahlung' [they have a naturally friendly way about them].

Boys commented that women are more polite on the telephone but that their politeness is often somewhat exaggerated 'etwas übertrieben'.

Older female informants considered women 'rücksichtsvoller' [more considerate], 'aufmerksamer' [more attentive], 'herzlicher' [warmer], 'achtsamer' [more courteous and thoughtful], 'hilfsbereiter' [more helpful], 'respektvoller' [more respectful], 'offener' [more open], 'spontaner' [more spontaneous]; they are also seen as better listeners and as less obsequious than they once were 'weniger unterwürfig wie früher'.

One man also mentioned that women are more open and talk more readily about their problems. As far as the other male informants were concerned, few additional comments were made.

One man claimed that women still frequently wait for the man to greet first, as was formerly dictated by tradition; another had noticed that women give more details than men when answering questions: this informant's job involved conducting opinion surveys, and he had noticed that women usually give precise reasons when refusing to be questioned, unlike men, who usually just say 'No'.

There were few claims on the part of one sex that members of the other were actually rude. One woman said that men are more polite towards men than towards women, and one claimed that foreign men are rude to Swiss women see 2.

Another woman portrayed men as 'zielgerichteter höflich' [more purposefully polite]. One man felt that women are often rude when they are trying to show that they are emancipated.

Some differences in para-linguistic behaviour were mentioned, especially that women kiss women and men, while men kiss only women and shake hands with men; also that young girls have recently started to kiss other girls on the mouth rather than on alternate cheeks.

The answers are as follows:. Every informant answered this question and all but one had been taught as a child that to greet properly was the first rule of politeness: 'Gib schön die Hand' [give your hand nicely] and 'Sag schön grüezi' [say hallo nicely] are phrases known to most children in GSS.

Many older people, but no informants under 26, also mentioned school as a place where one may be taught the basics of polite behaviour. Several older people lamented that politeness was no longer taught in schools and that many modern parents neglected their duties in this respect.

One nun, who had also trained as a nurse, had received classes in etiquette during her training. The one informant who had not learnt good manners from his parents or his school had been taught by his grandmother.

The majority of my informants claimed to greet invariably, whatever they felt like. Of my older informants, 3 men and 2 women Several people said that they greeted strangers more readily when they were happy, and more in summer than in winter.

Greeting impolitely is a serious FTA and similar, if not worse, in severity to not greeting at all. There are various reasons why a person might greet impolitely: people from foreign cultures may not know the Swiss greeting conventions, and Swiss people may or may not intend to be rude.

If a person wishes to show dislike of another person, greeting in a rude or off-hand manner is a good way of doing it. According to my informants, however, most GS Swiss people do their best to disguise their antipathy towards others.

The commonest way of greeting in an unfriendly fashion is to adjust one's tone of voice and to limit one's words to the essential minimum, for example a surly Morge rather than Guete Morge.

Wie gaht's? Other ways are adjusting one's facial expression, not offering one's hand, not uttering the addressee's name, and avoiding eye-contact 'das ist schlimmer als nicht grüssen' [that is worse than not greeting at all].

All of these methods complement the curtailed verbal greeting to create a highly disrespectful speech act. All of my informants claimed to greet people differently, depending on how much they liked them.

A significant difference between younger and older informants was that 14 The manner of greeting was as important as the formula, brevity being the most popular mode, e.

Morge or Tag not preceded by the more usual guete. One informant hoped that people he did not like did not notice this from the way he greeted them.

Most of my informants responded to this question very fully, offering up to 6 combinations of answers, e.

The chief differences between greetings addressed to people one does and does not like are in the length of the greeting and in the degree of formality.

Greetings to people who are liked are frequently followed by a "Gelegenheitsformel" , such as 'wächst's? A mention of the addressee's name is important, as are kisses, smiles, hugs, waves, hand-shakes, a friendly tone of voice and eye-contact.

Younger people preferred the formulae hoi, hallo, moin, tschau and tschüss , also the endearments Schatz [treasure, darling] and Spatz [sparrow, darling]; older informants found hoi and hallo friendlier than grüezi.

One informant told me that she greets people she likes very much with the informal Morge as opposed to guete Morge. As stated above 2. The abbreviated greeting is polite when addressed to one social extreme intimates and allies and impolite when addressed to the other strangers and antagonists ; those with whom one's relationship is less assured, i.

Taking leave before a long absence is a speech act which is very likely to be accompanied by "grooming talk" as described above section 1.

Verbal grooming is likely to be more thorough if a long absence is anticipated. The answers to this question were very similar to those to the previous question.

Most informants mentioned between 2 and 6 combinations of formulae, which included verbal and non-verbal features, e. Only 3 older informants plus my 4 ladies over 90 mentioned bhüet-di Gott [may God keep you] as a common supplement.

Physical gestures play an important role in leave-taking and a wider variety were mentioned by my informants than for any other occasion.

As well as kisses '3 Küssli' , hugs, and hand-shakes, one person suggested that she would take both hands of the person who was departing and one man said that he would touch a colleague on the shoulder.

Failure to respond to a greeting is a very serious FTA. How a person feels when his or her greeting is ignored depends upon the reasons for this omission.

The commonest and most excusable reason for a failure to reply is a simple failure to see or hear the other person. Many of my informants said that if they suspected this to be the case they would greet again, loudly.

If a failure to greet is due to ill will, the positive face of the victim can be severely damaged: people can worry for days if a friend or acquaintance does not greet them.

The remainder of the older informants minded very much. A wide variety of adjectives was suggested to describe how both young and old feel when their greeting is not answered: 'beleidigt' [offended], 'hässig' [angry], 'wütend' [furious], 'gekränkt' [hurt], 'scheisse' [shitty], 'irritiert' [irritated], 'frustriert' [frustrated], 'sauer' [annoyed], 'enttäuscht' [disappointed], 'zurückgestossen' [rejected], 'perplex' [perplexed], 'blöde' [stupid] and 'verachtet' [despised]; 'Ich denke, blas mir in die Schuhe' [in the sense of 'blow you, see if I care'].

A number of pejorative epithets were suggested: Arschloch, Idiot, blöder Flegel, Dobbel. Only one younger person thought that failure to greet was not a serious offence and said that thousands of people do not greet nowadays.

Another young informant thought that anyone who does not greet must be a very unhappy person. Most of my informants were able to answer this question: 38 In particular, modern developments in communication technology, such as e-mail, were considered responsible for a departure from traditional linguistic conventions.

If anyone was blamed for a decline in manners it was parents, but several informants believed that parents still do a good job: 'Die Eltern schauen schon auf die Höflichkeit der Kinder' [parents make sure that their children are polite].

One informant blamed any decline in manners on the "hippy generation", whose anti-authoritarian beliefs have caused them to neglect teaching their children how to live in the community.

A particularly common answer, especially from my informants over 60, related current greeting practices to the speed of life in the modern world: people, particularly young people, were seen as always being in a hurry, although not all old people condemned them for this.

One elderly woman claimed that the increased use of cars prevents people from greeting one another, and that people are not generally as friendly as they used to be: it is important to continue teaching children to greet 'um die Sitte aufrecht zu erhalten' [to preserve tradition].

My informants in the older group made more additional comments than those in the younger group. It was interesting to note, however, that my younger informants saw themselves as older people and commented that children are not taught manners: 'Kinder grüssen nicht mehr auf der Strasse' [children no longer greet in the street]; one wrote 'Es ist nicht mehr das Gleiche wie früher' [things are not like they used to be]!

A number of older informants found that greeting conventions are becoming simpler and less individual; greetings with "content" and a mention of God are being replaced by a brief grüezi or adieu.

Nearly every older informant had two or more answers to this question. Several of my informants drew my attention to the basic need to greet 'man hat den Bedarf zu grüssen' : only a few Eigenbrötler [loners] are held not to greet.

Some people complained of a dehumanization of modern society; others were certain that greeting rituals were much as they always had been and appreciated by most people.

One informant told of the training in politeness given by certain public service companies to their employees: in her opinion the employees of the postal service are well trained, those of the State Railway badly trained.

Many people from both urban and rural areas stressed the differences in greeting habits between people from the different environments: many town-dwellers claimed: 'Auf dem Land grüsst man mehr als in der Stadt' [People who live in the country greet more than those who live in towns], and village-dwellers said: 'In der Stadt wird nicht gegrüsst' [People in towns don't greet one another].

Hanna Hinnen points out another fundamental feature of greeting conventions in rural areas: inter-family feuds in small villages are more acute than in towns, and they can often continue for years.

In her study of the village of Feldis in Graubünden, Hinnen reports on families who have not greeted one another for ten years or more.

She tells of one child who would be told at the meal table whom she was allowed to greet and whom she should ignore: 'Mein Vater sagte jeweils am Tisch, wen man grüssen durfte und wen nicht.

Manchmal durfte man dann einen plötzlich nicht mehr grüssen. Das gab so ein Sippengefühl, das durfte nicht gebrochen werden' [My father would tell us at meal times whom we were allowed to greet and whom not.

Sometimes we were suddenly told not to greet a person. There were family bonds that one was not allowed to break]. Hinnen Comparisons were made with other countries.

America is seen as a land where people ask after a person's wellbeing without necessarily being interested in the answer: in Switzerland, apparently, people really want to know the answer when they ask: 'Wie geht es Dir?

Der Geld Besorgen darf dabei natürlich nicht fehlen. Kein Grund zur Panik, also antworte einfach ganz normal. Für Links auf dieser Seite erhält desired ggf. Dieses Thema im Zeitverlauf. Blumen erklärt: Vergissmeinnicht — Das bedeutet die zarte Blume! Lies auch. Aber was genau bedeutet das Yucutan gelbe Symbol? Kommentare zu diesem Artikel. Jetzt anmelden. Das bedeutet die Farbe deines Periodenbluts. Love is in the Air! Ihr könnt das im Auge behalten. Kuss-Smiley bei Amazon kaufen. Wählt dort den Reiter mit dem Smiley-Symbol. Und was Schmetterlinge Online Spielen Hölle will er mir jetzt schon wieder mit diesem Smiley sagen? Der Kuss-Smiley darf dabei natürlich nicht fehlen. Deshalb schickt Ihr Euch vermutlich nach jeder lieben Eye Or Horus oder zumindest vor dem Schlafengehen einen Kuss-Smiley mit zwinkerndem Auge, und natürlich auch noch mit dem kleinen Herz im Mundwinkel. Smiley Knutsch Smiley Knutsch

Smiley Knutsch Versionen & Unterstützung/Support Video

HOW TO DRAW A CUTE EMOJI,DRAW CUTE Kuss Smilies, Smileys, Emoticons, Smiles, Smeilis, Küssen, Kuß, Schmatzer, Kiss, kostenlos herunterladen, direkt kopieren oder verlinken in der.

I started my present research with a number of preconceptions about polite behaviour in GSS as well notions of stereotypes which I had learnt from scholarly literature in the field of sociolinguistics for example that women are more polite than men, and that most people believe what they perceive as linguistic decline to be the fault of young people.

One of my prejudices was that greeting in Switzerland was no more than a social convention and not always conveyed with a true spirit of goodwill.

My prejudice was confirmed when I asked a friend about the reasons for the Swiss system of greeting: I was told that greetings were based on 'Nützlichkeit' self-interest unless a real 'Zuneigung' affection for the addressee were present.

Thus when I came to write a questionnaire on politeness and greeting to use in my field-work, this was one of the theses that I set out to test.

After questioning 80 informants I found that only one other person thought of greetings as chiefly functioning to bring some material or non-material gain to the addressor.

From the start of my interviews I became aware that a very large proportion of my informants had a clear idea of the necessity to consider the face needs of their fellow human beings and that a greeting involved entering another person's territory this important finding will be further discussed below.

One thing that I learnt from my first few interviews was that Swiss people genuinely want to oil the wheels of social interaction by adhering to a set of long-standing conventions.

They do this not merely to make life easy for themselves, but out of respect, consideration and affection for their fellows. In his monograph Grüezi und Adieu Hauser , Albert Hauser documents the changes in greeting rituals since the seventeenth century.

He writes of a general degeneration of the "Benimmregeln" rules of politeness in twentieth-century Switzerland and the influence of the mass-media Hauser According to Hauser, increased demographic mobility and interpersonal familiarity have led to a decline in politeness but a democratization of human relationships Hauser Hauser also writes of the decline of "Arbeitsgrüsse' worker's greetings , "Gelegenheitsgrüsse" greetings for particular occasions or situations and "Willkommensgrüsse" welcoming greetings.

He describes the complexities of "Zeitgrüsse" greetings for particular times of day, or of the week or the year and notes a secularization of greeting rituals.

My research was designed to investigate further the changes in Swiss greeting culture. I hoped to establish how important the traditional rules of linguistic politeness were for GS Swiss people of all ages and how much change has taken place in recent years.

In particular I aimed to assess the effects upon Swiss society of the 'zunehmende Nähekultur' [increasing culture of familiarity] currently experienced in Europe generally see Held Does a widespread relaxation of politeness conventions and decrease in formality affect people's feelings of responsibility for the face needs of others?

Many of my informants thought that social rules are changing, but none agreed with the prejudice that young people have become more disrespectful Hinnen Hinnen also documents the opposite view: that children have become more open, more approachable and less fearful.

I also aimed to test the notion put forward by Holmes that women are more polite than men. Finally, I hoped to investigate the para-linguistic signs of politeness, such as kissing, eye-contact and the shaking of hands: how important are these for the speech acts of greeting and leave-taking as a whole?

For practical reasons, I adopted two different methods: one for school pupils and one for adults. In both cases a questionnaire was used to structure the sessions and an open type of question was asked.

I interviewed adults individually, writing down the information given to me; the young people filled in their own questionnaires with my help in two classes of some 20 pupils each at the Kaufmännische Handelsschule in Brugg Aargau.

In the case of the younger informants, I had to convince them that I was asking their opinion and not for the "right" answer as in an examination; some of the older informants found a number of my questions obscure, for example the phrase 'soziale Gruppe' frequently had to be explained.

Four old ladies of over 90 only agreed to be questioned if they could answer my 'schwierige Fragen' [difficult questions] together. With each interviewee I found that the session went smoothly once I had explained the reasons for my research.

My aim was to conduct a qualitative evaluation of aspects of verbal politeness and greeting in GSS. I found the methods used by Hanna Hinnen for her study of social change in the Graubünden village of Feldis very helpful.

Like Hinnen Hinnen I used my questionnaire as an aid "Leitfaden" to get people talking. Hinnen started with a questionnaire of six sides which she in time reduced to two, so I started with three sides and, like Hinnen, was prepared to adjust my questions to suit the informant.

I did not push my informants to answer questions which they found difficult. I was nevertheless able to retain a core of questions which were answered by all of my informants, and which I will be able to use to provide a certain amount of quantitative data.

My 80 informants were aged between 16 and 96 43 people under 26 and 37 over 26; 12 of the latter were over 60 and came from a range of social and educational backgrounds: housewives, businessmen, editors of the Schweizerdeutsches Wörterbuch , professors and teachers, two nuns, two hotel owners, a gardener, a foreman, a hairdresser, a dressmaker, a lawyer, two engineers and one opinion pollster.

All of these were enthusiastic and helpful, which strengthened my view that a high proportion of GS Swiss people are very interested in their own language and linguistic practices.

I must add, however, that I failed to interview anyone who did not believe that politeness and greeting rituals were important because the few rude people that I met refused to give me an interview.

I questioned people from a variety of regions, from the mountain village of Feldis in Graubünden 4 to the city of Zürich 5. Feldis is a traditiona but all of my informants were native speakers of Swiss German.

Most of my informants, and all of the younger informants those under 26 , came from the towns and villages in the canton of Aargau. As I had expected, my young informants' answers were generally much briefer than those given by my older interviewees.

The young people gave fuller answers than the older group to the questions about actual greeting formulae and much shorter answers to the questions about opinions on various aspects of politeness.

Where there are significant differences between the generations I have interpreted their answers separately and provided statistics. Furthermore, I was occasionally able to make generalizations about my 12 informants over There were fewer group differences between male and female informants, although I have been able to document some specific opinions held by one sex about the other, particularly for the question: Sind Frauen höflicher als Männer?

Most of my younger informants wrote all of their answers in dialect; the older group of informants, who were interviewed, spoke either dialect or standard German.

Some older informants switched into dialect during the interview and these people generally became more animated after the switch.

The results of my survey fall into two distinct areas, and these will be dealt with in sections 2. The first section describes lexical aspects of greeting: the actual formulae that are uttered and the phatic formulae that often follow the initial greeting.

The second section documents the opinions and emotions of my informants in relation to greeting rituals: how important is such ritual to most germanophone Swiss?

And how well do the traditions of greeting survive in a modern world where formality and convention are said to be in decline? Greeting "properly" in GSS involves more than merely saying grüezi and adieu.

A greeting is generally accompanied by a hand-shake or, when close friends greet, kisses on alternate cheeks usually three. All of my adult informants used a selection of the above formulae and most agreed that it is never enough to just say grüezi to a person one knows: one should always mention the interlocutor's name and it is usually possible to say something topical, even if it is only in recognition of the time of day, as in schöne Namittag.

Many informants felt it polite to offer a Gelegenheitsgruss or an Arbeitsgruss if the other person was obviously occupied with a specific task see section 2.

In all other regions the evening begins much later, from about 5. A steady secularization of greeting formulae, which Hauser attributes to the effects of the Enlightenment Hauser 12 , is now almost complete.

The disappearance of God, as in the degeneration of Gott grüess-di to grüezi and got geb iu guote naht to guete Nacht , was already well under way in the early twentieth century when Anna Zollinger-Escher published her land-mark work on greeting traditions Zollinger-Escher As I suspected that young people use a wider range of greeting formulae than older people, I asked some more specific questions about greeting conventions questions i.

I made it clear to the 43 pupils in Brugg that I was looking for both words and actions and was able to gather valuable information about both verbal and para-verbal aspects of greeting.

The questions and results follow. It should be noted that most pupils gave more than one answer:. Young people also provided a wide range of answers to the questions on greeting using modern methods of communication, such as e-mail and text-messaging.

The following questions were also put to older informants:. Most claimed that an e-mail message is composed rather like a letter, i.

For these informants it was important to distinguish between formal and informal relationships between interactants.

For interactants who address one another as Sie greetings are one of the following as well as the name of the addressee: sehr geehrte r , liebe r , hallo, guten Tag.

The leave-taking formulae are one or more of the following: tschüss, mit freundlichem Gruss, einen schönen Tag. My younger informants claimed to write an e-mail in a less formal style than a letter, often using dialect.

Formulae for leave-taking were more elaborate still: tschau, tschüss li , sali, hoi, moin, grüessli, greets presumably under English influence , bye , cu see you , Big Kiss, Küssli, take care, ha di lieb, bis bald, schöne Tag, MFG mit freundlichem Gruss , LG liebe Grüsse and biscus.

Only one young person listed possible greeting formulae for use at work: guten Tag and mit freundlichem Gruss. Only 3 older informants use text messages as a means of communication, whereas only 3 of my younger informants did not.

All users agreed that an SMS message is less formal than an e-mail message. In general, e-mail seems to be the preferred modern method of communication in the workplace, while text messages are used by friends.

One person claimed to use an emoticon a "smiley" or no greeting at all; another said that he sometimes wrote a text message in dialect.

Young people are the experts at composing text messages. They abbreviate as many words as possible to keep the length of the message to a minimum, indeed a new form of language appears to be emerging in connection with short message systems.

Greetings and leave-takings used by youngsters are as varied as those used for e-mails, if not more so. Some younger informants use no formulae at all and others use only a "smiley", which is represented with the following symbols: The next three questions were intended to ascertain whether people still use traditional, task-oriented greeting formulae as documented by Hauser I chose three occasions where I thought that people might still use special phatic formulae: the first, 'Was sagen Sie einem Menschen, der im Garten arbeitet?

Many informants, both young and old, knew of no formulae for any of these three situations but invented a relevant phrase, such as 'Gut Busch' [good bush!

The second question stemmed from a misconception on my part that Swiss people wash their own cars, as many of us still do in Great Britain. I was told that most Swiss people take their cars to an automated car-wash, and it was often against local law to wash one's car in the street.

This fact did not prevent some informants making appropriate suggestions. I was also told that if a person were working in a cow shed or stable Stall one would not see them unless the door were open and in any case most farm-workers were from Yugoslavia.

It was interesting to note that the informant who is a gardener by profession knew of nothing special to say to people working in their gardens, but knew particular greetings for sportsmen Hals und Beinbruch , fishermen Petri heil , sailors Mast- und Schotbruch and hunters Gut Schuss.

One women suggested that a feasible equivalent to a car would be a person washing windows and claimed: 'Wenn jemand sagt "wird's sauber?

Many of my older informants maintained that they would not expect to meet a farmer at work with his animals; others said that they would think of an appropriate comment depending on what the farmer was doing at the time; still others that only another farmer would know what to say.

All of my informants could answer this question and most older people mentioned two or more reasons for the importance of greeting.

Two people gave 'Nützlichkeit' self-interest as a main answer, but all others were more positive. One category of response that I had most expected to hear, 'man hat das gelernt als Kind' [we learnt it as children] or 'aus Gewohnheit' [out of habit], was only popular with informants over the age of The two most frequent answers, given by over one third of my informants, were: 'Kontakt herzustellen' [to make contact] and 'Aufrechterhaltung des Kontakts' [to maintain contact].

The second most frequent answer was: 'Aus Höflichkeit' [to be polite], and the third 'um ein Gespräch anzufangen' [to start a conversation].

Other answers demonstrated that many informants have a clear idea of the importance of respect for the "face", both "negative' and "positive", of their interactants: they want to show that they like and respect the other person and that they aim to do so as unintrusively as possible, e.

Many informants explicitly mentioned respect Respekt or Würdigung as a reason to greet. Perhaps surprisingly, only one person gave the response: 'Gäste willkommen zu heissen' [to welcome guests], and only one: 'Wenn man eine Person das erste Mal an einem Tag sieht' [When one sees someone for the first time that day], perhaps because it seemed too obvious an answer for most people to give.

One informant might have been speaking for all the others when she said: 'Es ist so normal wie Sand am Meer' [It is as normal as sand at the seaside].

First I must explain why I asked this rather provocative question. Over the years I have noticed that a variety of outsiders in Switzerland, from punks to drunks and from foreigners to beggars, are criticized either for not knowing how to greet properly or for not greeting at all.

As an outsider myself, I know how long it can take to learn the wide variety of conventions of politeness in GSS. Indeed, I spoke with a beggar, representing a social group which is much maligned in many societies, and he wished me 'schönen Aabe' [a nice evening] when I went on my way.

Male and female informants of both age-groups had similar opinions. One woman mentioned foreign men as impolite; another woman felt that Moslem women are unable to make eye-contact, if they greet at all, because their head-scarves act as a barrier to communication.

The second largest group to be criticized by 5 young people, i. Other social groups to be mentioned by 1 or 2 informants were punks, drunks, sports fans, people from a low social class, psychologically disturbed people, people under stress, uneducated people, old people, young people up to 17 years old by a twenty-year-old and small children under 10 years old by a year-old.

It was generally recognized that many groups who do not fit into conventional society "Randgruppen" have their own greeting conventions among themselves: they may not greet according to traditionally accepted convention, but they have special ways of communicating with other social "misfits".

There was also some understanding that people from other cultures do not necessarily mean to be rude by Swiss standards when they fail to greet.

All of my informants were able to answer this question, and many gave additional comments including opinions about the comparative politeness of older people which I will document here.

Some informants who asked: 'Was heisst jung? To me, the informants under 26 were young and those over 26 old er , but my young informants considered themselves older than children and my informants over the age of 60 considered anyone under 60 to be young.

Bearing such subjective judgments in mind it is still possible to draw some general conclusions from the answers to this question.

Traditionally, younger people have been expected to greet older people first and many older people expect this custom to be adhered to often in vain.

Other older people recognize that if young people are to be expected to be polite to them, they must be polite in return, and this might mean greeting first.

My 4 female informants over the age of 90 agreed that they had more time than younger people to pay attention to the conventions of politeness.

They also agreed that most young people are very polite, even saying 'danke' when old people stand aside to allow them to pass on their skateboards. Both negative and positive judgements were expressed by both old and young informants about the old and the young generally.

Young people claimed that older people were 'freundlicher' [more friendly] and 'geduldiger' [more patient]; on the other hand they can be 'mürrisch' [surly] and 'stur' [stubborn].

Young people were often seen as 'höflicher' [more polite], 'offener' [more open], 'lebenslustiger' [fuller of the joy of living], 'kontaktfreudiger' [more sociable], and more likely to smile when greeting one another.

My older informants may see themselves as 'anständiger' [better behaved] and more genuinely interested in their speech partner, but also as likely to be 'gehemmter' [more inhibited] and 'stur' [stubborn].

Informants of all ages agreed that old people are 'grussfreudiger' 'sie grüssen eher' [they greet more readily]. No older people claimed that young people are impolite, but one woman claimed that older people speak more precisely than young people - a perception which is common to many cultures.

Finally, one of the nuns that I questioned commented that young people have been calling her 'Pinguin' [penguin] and 'ferngesteuerter Kohlensack' [remote-controlled sack of coal] for decades.

According to Janet Holmes, women are more positively polite than men. They take responsibility for social cohesion, are more cooperative than men in many communicative situations, and avoid FTAs more resolutely than men.

Their politeness may be seen as resulting from their powerlessness in society Holmes 19 , or it may be a consequence of their being more sympathetic and attentive to others "other-oriented" than men Holmes 7.

Holmes drew her conclusions from a large number of studies on gender and politeness. My aim with Question iv was to see if they could be confirmed with respect to politeness in GSS.

One older male informant said that I was asking about an "antiquated" stereotype, but he was still able to give me examples of women being ruder than men.

Most of the additional comments originated with female informants and supported Holmes's finding that women are more other-oriented than men.

Girls found that women are 'herzlicher' [warmer], 'verständnisvoller' [more understanding] and 'weniger primitiv' [less crude].

One girl wrote: 'Sie haben von Natur aus eine freundliche Ausstrahlung' [they have a naturally friendly way about them]. Boys commented that women are more polite on the telephone but that their politeness is often somewhat exaggerated 'etwas übertrieben'.

Older female informants considered women 'rücksichtsvoller' [more considerate], 'aufmerksamer' [more attentive], 'herzlicher' [warmer], 'achtsamer' [more courteous and thoughtful], 'hilfsbereiter' [more helpful], 'respektvoller' [more respectful], 'offener' [more open], 'spontaner' [more spontaneous]; they are also seen as better listeners and as less obsequious than they once were 'weniger unterwürfig wie früher'.

One man also mentioned that women are more open and talk more readily about their problems. As far as the other male informants were concerned, few additional comments were made.

One man claimed that women still frequently wait for the man to greet first, as was formerly dictated by tradition; another had noticed that women give more details than men when answering questions: this informant's job involved conducting opinion surveys, and he had noticed that women usually give precise reasons when refusing to be questioned, unlike men, who usually just say 'No'.

There were few claims on the part of one sex that members of the other were actually rude. One woman said that men are more polite towards men than towards women, and one claimed that foreign men are rude to Swiss women see 2.

Another woman portrayed men as 'zielgerichteter höflich' [more purposefully polite]. One man felt that women are often rude when they are trying to show that they are emancipated.

Some differences in para-linguistic behaviour were mentioned, especially that women kiss women and men, while men kiss only women and shake hands with men; also that young girls have recently started to kiss other girls on the mouth rather than on alternate cheeks.

The answers are as follows:. Every informant answered this question and all but one had been taught as a child that to greet properly was the first rule of politeness: 'Gib schön die Hand' [give your hand nicely] and 'Sag schön grüezi' [say hallo nicely] are phrases known to most children in GSS.

Many older people, but no informants under 26, also mentioned school as a place where one may be taught the basics of polite behaviour.

Several older people lamented that politeness was no longer taught in schools and that many modern parents neglected their duties in this respect.

One nun, who had also trained as a nurse, had received classes in etiquette during her training. The one informant who had not learnt good manners from his parents or his school had been taught by his grandmother.

The majority of my informants claimed to greet invariably, whatever they felt like. Of my older informants, 3 men and 2 women Several people said that they greeted strangers more readily when they were happy, and more in summer than in winter.

Greeting impolitely is a serious FTA and similar, if not worse, in severity to not greeting at all. There are various reasons why a person might greet impolitely: people from foreign cultures may not know the Swiss greeting conventions, and Swiss people may or may not intend to be rude.

If a person wishes to show dislike of another person, greeting in a rude or off-hand manner is a good way of doing it. According to my informants, however, most GS Swiss people do their best to disguise their antipathy towards others.

The commonest way of greeting in an unfriendly fashion is to adjust one's tone of voice and to limit one's words to the essential minimum, for example a surly Morge rather than Guete Morge.

Wie gaht's? Other ways are adjusting one's facial expression, not offering one's hand, not uttering the addressee's name, and avoiding eye-contact 'das ist schlimmer als nicht grüssen' [that is worse than not greeting at all].

All of these methods complement the curtailed verbal greeting to create a highly disrespectful speech act. All of my informants claimed to greet people differently, depending on how much they liked them.

A significant difference between younger and older informants was that 14 The manner of greeting was as important as the formula, brevity being the most popular mode, e.

Morge or Tag not preceded by the more usual guete. One informant hoped that people he did not like did not notice this from the way he greeted them.

Most of my informants responded to this question very fully, offering up to 6 combinations of answers, e.

The chief differences between greetings addressed to people one does and does not like are in the length of the greeting and in the degree of formality.

Greetings to people who are liked are frequently followed by a "Gelegenheitsformel" , such as 'wächst's? A mention of the addressee's name is important, as are kisses, smiles, hugs, waves, hand-shakes, a friendly tone of voice and eye-contact.

Younger people preferred the formulae hoi, hallo, moin, tschau and tschüss , also the endearments Schatz [treasure, darling] and Spatz [sparrow, darling]; older informants found hoi and hallo friendlier than grüezi.

One informant told me that she greets people she likes very much with the informal Morge as opposed to guete Morge. As stated above 2.

The abbreviated greeting is polite when addressed to one social extreme intimates and allies and impolite when addressed to the other strangers and antagonists ; those with whom one's relationship is less assured, i.

Taking leave before a long absence is a speech act which is very likely to be accompanied by "grooming talk" as described above section 1.

Verbal grooming is likely to be more thorough if a long absence is anticipated. The answers to this question were very similar to those to the previous question.

Most informants mentioned between 2 and 6 combinations of formulae, which included verbal and non-verbal features, e.

Only 3 older informants plus my 4 ladies over 90 mentioned bhüet-di Gott [may God keep you] as a common supplement. Physical gestures play an important role in leave-taking and a wider variety were mentioned by my informants than for any other occasion.

As well as kisses '3 Küssli' , hugs, and hand-shakes, one person suggested that she would take both hands of the person who was departing and one man said that he would touch a colleague on the shoulder.

Failure to respond to a greeting is a very serious FTA. How a person feels when his or her greeting is ignored depends upon the reasons for this omission.

The commonest and most excusable reason for a failure to reply is a simple failure to see or hear the other person.

Many of my informants said that if they suspected this to be the case they would greet again, loudly.

If a failure to greet is due to ill will, the positive face of the victim can be severely damaged: people can worry for days if a friend or acquaintance does not greet them.

The remainder of the older informants minded very much. Tags: chicago broadway musical pop six squish uh uh murder cicero mike orator knowledge.

Tags: uh oh, uh oh spaghettios, spaghettios, cute, spill, kawaii, animated, punny, puns, pun, funny. Uh-Oh SpaghettiOs!

Leggings By AmbrosialArts. Tags: spider, uh, icon. Tags: thewalkingdead, the walking dead, twd, zombie, zombies, zombieland, zombie field, uh oh, fence, faded, old, withered, weathered, vintage, classic, vintage, grunge, punk, dead, death, halloween, spooky.

Tags: stinky, le monke, monkey, meme, funny, poop, poopy, uh oh, uh oh stinky, tiktok. Tags: yeah, uh huh, whatever. Yeah, Yeah. Leggings By BtheLight.

Tags: uh, huh, funny, humor. Tags: huey, huey helicopter, vietnam helicopter, bell uh 1, bell hu 1, bell helicopter, chopper, vietnam chopper, mash helicopter, mash, medivac, united states army helicopter, vietnam war, steve h clark.

Tags: murder, kill, dead, death, musical, chicago, pop, six, squish, uh uh, cicero, lipshitz, broadway, show, play. He had it coming Leggings By ArtistAriana.

Tags: uh, kiss, uh kiss, kiss mouth, peck, knutsch, smooch, knutschmund, knut shear, smooch stain, love, good kisser.

Tags: meme, stinky, uh oh, monkey, stinky monkey, oh, uh, uh oh stinky, baboon, gorilla, fart, noise, loud, smelly, poop, diaper, funny, hillarious, joke, memee, ape, birthday, christmas, wrapping, original.

Uh Oh Stinky Leggings By luminak. Tags: uh huh, acceptable, agreed, clunse. Acceptable Leggings By Clunse.

Tags: sikorsky, uh 34d, helicopter cartoon. Tags: houston, cougars, uh, cougars. Cougars Merch Leggings By pandujancuk. Tags: helicopter, uh 60, cartoon helicopter.

Tags: cloud, vapor, vaporwave, vapourwave, lemon, graphic, sargemac, street, streetwear, fashion, vector. Leggings By SargeMac. Tags: uh oh, stinky, poop, funny, poopy, monkey, le monke, animal, meme, internet, uh oh stinky, fat, primate, nature.

Tags: uh, eyes, ten eye cartoon, line art, doodle, conceptual art, experimental art, cartoon art, graphic art, simple, minimalist, dark art, black, titus toledo.

Leggings By titus toledo. Tags: university of miami. Leggings By SpencerFlinson. Tags: cartoon, comic, confused.

Uh Leggings By Alwaysxray. UH Leggings By barbaradouglas. Tags: b2k, tour , hip hop, albums, song, uh uh, gots ta be, omarion, fizz b2k, lil fizz, j boog.

Tags: chicago, pop, six, squish, uh uh, uh, cicero, lipschitz, musical, musicals, play, drama, theatre, theater, broadway, rehearsal, the musical, cell, cellblock, cell block tango, tango, dance, jail, geekably, funny, cute.

Chicago Leggings By geekably. Tags: le monke, uh oh stinky, meme. Tags: monke, uh oh stinky, stinky poo, stinky monkey, fat monkey, funny monkey, monkey meme, meme, dank meme, uh oh, poopies.

Uh Oh Stinky! Tags: jeffy, sml, why, uh, dipper, funny. Tags: uh, invader zim, gir, fan art. Tags: le monke, monkey, uh oh stinky. Tags: uh, children, emotion, anger, stupid, happy, frightened, laugh, being, fantastic, flat, abstract, monster, cute, cartoon, alien, creature, funny, face, halloween, animal, little, colorful, mascot, comic, cheerful, kids, mutant, toy, bizarre, spooky, smile, bubble.

Cartoon monsters. Leggings By alijun. Tags: b2k, millennium, tour, , hiphop, boy band, albums, songs, uh uh, gots ta be, omarion, fizz b2k, lil fizz, j boog.

B2K Tour Leggings By iieurpaiuhd. Tags: uh oh stinky, uh oh, stinky, le monke, monkey, poopy, poop, memes, meme, dank, gamer, funny, anime, tiktok, poo, tiktok.

Tags: vnaf, uh 1, gunship, cartoon, aviation art. Tags: cat, kitty, what, help, uh, uwu, owo. UwU Leggings By emoryherbert.

Tags: uh, oh, style, cool, music, handsome, album. Golden Stars Leggings By colemangonz. Tags: sml, jeffy, funny, uh, youtube, sll, sbl.

Tags: wilson, cast away, tom hanks, wilson volleyball, stranded island, robert zemekis, best friend for life, bff, bff forever, indian, skull bites knife, native american, silence of the lambs, skull, bones, skeleton, tattoo, moth, i will tear your saw apart, hellraiser, pinhead, cenobites, hellbound heart, clive barker, horror, cult classic, nightbreed, doug bradley, mattismatt83, smoke, match, light, flame.

Leggings By MattisMatt Tags: redbubble man, funny, stinky, uh, oh, poopy. Tags: cube, life, house, uh, box, mountain, cliff. Tags: sml, jeffy, bowerjr, cheafpeepee, uh, youtube, supermariologan.

Tags: university of houston, texas, houston, uh, shasta. Tags: uh, oh, stinky, poo, haha, funny, poopy. Tags: , cannabis, uh, day, marijuana, weed, weedday.

Tags: army, uh, 60, black, hawk, helicopter, aircraft. Tags: same, uh ha ha, even, anthony adams. Tags: jeffy sml why uh dipper funny doib.

Tags: american, dad, adult, swim, cool, nuh, uh, your, huh meow, stan, smiths, roger, klaus, swag, yolo, lol, nuh uh to your uh huh, seth macfarlane, comedy, humour, funny, amazing, family guy, quotes, speech, speech bubble, quote, lolz, novelty.

Tags: dino, dinosaur, t rex, uh oh, comic, cute. Leggings By La-mama-crazy. Tags: uh 1, helicopter, cartoon, line art, aviation art.

Tags: vnaf, uh 1, gunship, helicopter, cartoon, aviation art. Tags: huey, uh 1, gunship, helicopter, cartoon, aviation art.

Tags: monke, monkey meme, meme, dank meme, uh oh stinky, le monke, poop meme, uh oh stinky monkey, gorilla, election, electoral college, election, president, voting.

Tags: pepe, space, funny, haha, stinky, uh oh, meme, trump. Tags: mineta, mha, bnha, anime, grape juice, meme, uh oh. Tags: nope, no, nah, nuh uh, not going to happen.

Nope Leggings By DotorEaon. Tags: spicy, pumpkin, pumpkin spice, latte, uh oh, tasty, donuts. Dunkin' Donuts Uh Oh Spicy!

Pumpkin Tasty Leggings By underbear. Tags: high, party, clubeur, reveler, uh, calumed, weed, koint, superhigh.

Tags: vnaf, huey, uh 1, gunship, helicopter, cartoon, aviation art. Tags: uh oh, oh no, oops, flower, mistake, ellory, taite. Uh-oh Leggings By Ellory Taite.

Facebooktwitterredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Posted by Samutaxe

0 comments

Ich meine, dass das Thema sehr interessant ist. Ich biete Ihnen es an, hier oder in PM zu besprechen.

Schreibe einen Kommentar